2001 Formula Hawk #293 Resto-mod thread.

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opie
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Re: 2001 Formula Hawk #293 Restoration thread.

Post by opie » Tue Jan 23, 2018 6:11 am

Looking great! 👍
02SOMHAWK374

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NBrehm
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Re: 2001 Formula Hawk #293 Restoration thread.

Post by NBrehm » Sun May 27, 2018 9:29 am

Door panel crack prevention:
SO I am sure some, if not many of you have had the top piece of plastic on your door panel crack. Here are a couple of tips to prevent it and how I modded my panels.

Cause:
There are several possible causes from impact or sometimes slamming doors which the only way to prevent is to not slam the door or hit it, but the one that gets people with age is the window sweep. The window sweep is held on from the factory with heavy duty staples. They are great for fastening, but as the sweep ages the rubber tends to shrink and the staple is not strong enough to hold it in place. It not only tears the rubber on the sweep a little, but as it shrinks it pulls in on the plastic on the door until "POP" the panel cracks. So the fix is fairly simple. Take the door panel off, remove the staples and replace them with small screws. when I say small I mean 4-6MM tops. The increased holding force of the screws will keep the sweep from shrinking down as much for a longer period of time. All you have to do is get the screws (I used brass and self tapping because they won't rust), put the sweep in place and carefully drill the appropriate sized hole through the sweep into the plastic, and then put the screws in. Go slow and make sure the alignment of the sweep is correct before you drill. Total cost was about $10. Also while you are in there make sure all of the door panel hook anti rattle foam is in place. Mine was missing a whole bunch of it. If it is missing just get some high density foam (any kind will do) cut it down to about a 2X2 piece, slit the middle, and slide it over the hook. 2 Very easy things to make sure your door panels stay in tip top shape. Mine were already a little busted up so they will have to be replaced eventually, but for now this should keep them looking decent until then.

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For this post:
25Pk of brass screws/washers $12.45 @ home depot
High density foam $0.00 (had on hand)
Total Cost this post $12.45
Overall cost:$4796.45

Labor this Post: 2.0hrs
Total Labor: 61 hrs
Last edited by NBrehm on Wed Sep 25, 2019 10:48 am, edited 1 time in total.
-Nick
2001 Formula Firehawk #293

2002 red hawk
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Re: 2001 Formula Hawk #293 Restoration thread.

Post by 2002 red hawk » Sat Jun 02, 2018 1:32 am

I did this as preventive maintenance years ago. I used 4mm stainless screws for a cleaner look. The only time you can see the screw heads is when then window is all the way down. Panels still look perfect. This procedure is well worth doing if your panels are not already cracked.


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NBrehm
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Re: 2001 Formula Hawk #293 Restoration thread.

Post by NBrehm » Fri Jul 27, 2018 5:06 pm

Sorry I've been so quiet on this thread for awhile. The Hawk has been hiding away most of the summer, the original 10 bolt is getting a bit sketchy so I don't take it far. I also moved which has limited my ability to get rolling on the Axle rebuild at the shop. Might get some stuff done this weekend if I can get some quick welding done. I am good at many things, but welding is not one of them......
-Nick
2001 Formula Firehawk #293

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NBrehm
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Re: 2001 Formula Hawk #293 Restoration thread.

Post by NBrehm » Sun Sep 02, 2018 5:20 pm

Got some of the work done for the 10 bolt. It is FAR from show quality but the intent is functionality and reducing the possibility of rust in the future.

**Important safety tip for this post, with the exception of the soap wear a respirator for all of these chemical treatments and paints and do them in a well ventilated area or if possible outside. They work very well but they are EXTREMELY hazardous to your health**


First I cleaned the ever living heck out of it with the Purple Castrol cleaner. I have not found anything that works as well at degreasing (that doesn't punch holes in the Ozone layer anyway). Once all the grime was off I could see what I had to work with.

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After that I packed it up and sent it out to have the axle tubes welded to the center section. Not the best welds I've seen, but I am terrible at it, lol. Welding the tubes takes a pretty big chunk of flex out of the rear which is one o the leading causes of failure on these cars. Every little bit helps.
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Now the real work began. With the amount of rust on it I decided to use a rust converter before I primed it. Converter will only stick to pure rust, but it chemically alters it into it's own primer.
***Note: A suggestion I would make is to use a red primer/rust encapsulator, I used black. They work identically, but the converter turns the rust black, and then priming and painting in black makes it difficult to tell what's covered and what isn't, as you'll see in the following pics**
I'm also changing out the yoke, which is why I did not mask it off to avoid getting paint on it

Here it is with the rust converter:
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Then I primed it with rust encapsulator to prevent it from rusting again the future:
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And lastly, used Eastwoods new Ceramic 2 stage chassis paint on it
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For this post:
1 Gallon of Castrol Super Clean degreaser $17.00
Welding (Professional) $80.00
1 Can of Eastwood Chassis clean $7.00
1 Can of Eastwood Rust Converter $20.00
1 Can of Eastwood Rust Encapsulator $20.00
1 Can of Eastwood Ceramic 2K Chassis Black $25.00

Total Cost for This post: $169.00
Total Cost Overall: $4938.45

Labor this Post: 12 hrs (36 if you count watching paint dry!!)
Total Labor: 73 hrs
Last edited by NBrehm on Wed Sep 25, 2019 10:48 am, edited 1 time in total.
-Nick
2001 Formula Firehawk #293

2002 red hawk
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Re: 2001 Formula Hawk #293 Restoration thread.

Post by 2002 red hawk » Sat Sep 08, 2018 9:15 pm

Watching paint dry is one of the more riveting aspects of auto restoration.

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NBrehm
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Re: 2001 Formula Hawk #293 Restoration thread.

Post by NBrehm » Sun Sep 09, 2018 8:50 am

2002 red hawk wrote:
Sat Sep 08, 2018 9:15 pm
Watching paint dry is one of the more riveting aspects of auto restoration.
It was humid too, took FOREVER
-Nick
2001 Formula Firehawk #293

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NBrehm
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Re: 2001 Formula Hawk #293 Restoration thread.

Post by NBrehm » Wed Sep 25, 2019 10:02 am

LMC Headlamp install, headlamp housing replacement
Been awhile, with fall and winter approaching it's time to start wrenching again. Up next I decided to upgrade the headlamps from the stock sealed beams to the LMC Halogen bulb type. Disclaimer, this is really as simple as swapping your bulbs out, this is a bit more in depth because i also had a bad hinge on one housing. I did kinda short the pics a little, but it is all pretty straightforward.

1: If you are going to be removing the headlamp assembly, Pull the 2 10MM bolts from the top of the assembly where it bolts to the car. If you don't do it now the headlamp may block them. i think you will also be able to reach them if you pull the metal cover off the assembly, but I pulled the housing out as a whole
2: turn on the headlamps and either disconnect the battery (easiest if you are just doing the bulbs) or pull the fuses for the motors, which are located under the hood, and turn the headlamps back off. I did this because I knew I would be adjusting the new housing which requires running the assembly up ad down several times.
3: remove the 3 screws that hold the plastic headlamp bezel and remove the bezel.
4: If you are doing just the bulbs, unscrew the sealed beams and install the new housings
5: remove the 2 10MM bolts that attach the nose to where the hood latch is so you can move the bracket slightly.
6: On the left and right of the housing, under the lights, there are 4 studs with 10mm nuts, remove the nuts and be careful not to drop them into the nose.
7: With the 4 nuts and 2 top bolts, and 2 nose panel bolts removed (circled in blue), you should be able to slide the assembly forward and pivot it out from the nose and fender. Be careful as the plug sits behind the assembly and doesn't have a lot of slack, so make sure you get it disconnected before you yank too hard. when that is done, it should look like this.
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8: while I was in here, since I have a Formula I now had very easy access to the fog light and DRL. I swapped them both out for Silverstars (Fogs are 880's, DRL's are 3157A's). I took note of both of my DRL sockets being in rough shape, which is common, and I will address them in my next post as I still have some wiring to fix. I also found out the 5 pin motor/headlamp connector on my car (the carside) was scorched, so that will be getting a change also.
9: I got a used headlamp assembly from Hawks that had a good hinge, and now is when I pulled out the new LMC headlamps. One thing I noticed immediately was the lamp to car connector was just bare pins. I will also address that in my next post, I'll get some weatherpack connectors and re-wire them
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10: First i swapped out the bulbs in the installed housing. for now to hold the wires in I just used electrical tape. This is a TEMPORARY fix, if you do it, do it right. the car isn't going to be driven so for now it is not a concern.
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11: I then moved my new headlamp motor over to the new assembly, then installed the donor headlamp assembly in the reverse order I removed it, then the lamps.
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12: Next up was the absolute marathon of adjustments on the housing for alignment. There is a little slop in the entire housing. So before you tighten it all down, try and center in the bucket with the hood, nose and fender to get the gaps right. Tighten down the 4 nuts and 2 bolts on the housing so it doesn't move. After that it is really trial by error of adjusting all the 10mm plastic white bolts. Even from the factory, there didn't seem to be a lot of effort into as they are all over the place. I started with the headlamp closed. i adjusted all the stops, then opeened it and adjusted all the stops. Lastly I put the headlight door on, got it to where I wanted it and then adjusted all the bolts up until they made contact with it. it is VERY time consuming, and takes some patience, and a lot of trial and error.
End result
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I ran out of time there as I had to troubleshoot the bad motor plug, but I'll show you guys how to upgrade the wiring and adjusted the actual lamps next.
One last note, brand new headlamp assemblies are still available at Hawks, i think they bought up all the old stock, they are, however, about $850.00. If you are looking for a straight swap out it may be the way to go, i went this route because i was changing up some parts, but the total comes out to close to $450.00 this way and there is still some slop in the used assembly a new one would not have.
For this post:
LMC 36-0203 (x2): $70.00
LMC 36-0203 (x2): $70.00
Sylvania Silverstar 880 (x2): $48.00
Sylvania Silverstar 3157A (x2): $12.00
Used headlamp assembly: $150.00

Total Cost for This post: $350.00
Total Cost Overall: $5289.00

Labor this Post: 6 hours
Total Labor: 79 hrs
Last edited by NBrehm on Sun May 03, 2020 7:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
-Nick
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NBrehm
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Re: 2001 Formula Hawk #293 Restoration thread.

Post by NBrehm » Sun May 03, 2020 7:28 pm

It's spring time, and since we are all locked down right now I decided what better time than to knock out some more stuff on the Firehawk Here is what is on the docket for this round. Since my GTA project has been stagnant I decide to "borrow" the rear suspension for and see how I like it compared to the stock pieces. Maybe I'll leave them on, Maybe I won't. A good technique since there will be A LOT of nuts and bolts coming out for this, as long as there are no clearance issues, I reinstall all the bolts/nuts from where they came from as the car comes apart. That helps keep them orderly and makes sure the right ones go back in the right places if you re-use them.

-Replace Rear Main Seal
-Replace Clutch/Flywheel
-Repair bent CAT flange
-Replace Y-pipe with 2nd Gen SLP Y-pipe
-Subframe Connectors
-Rear LCA's
-Upper and lower Panahrd Bars
-Torque Arm and relocation bracket
-Finish light upgrade wiring
-Repair rear axle seal leak.
-Minor spot rust repair
-Clean/Paint exhaust heat shields

First up is the clutch, flywheel, and rear main seal. There is a lot to getting the transmission out, I'm not going to outline the whole process here but if you are first timer I would def not try and pull the trans without the proper tools and a complete step by step guide. I'll hit the highlights here on what needs to be removed, but for specific procedures get instructions. If anyone is tackling it and has questions please let me know and I can get you a full guide

Underhood:
-Disconnect the Negative battery Cable

Interior:
-Remove Shifter Knob
-Remove Console top
-Remove console
-Remove shifter handle
-Remove shifter boot
-Remove shifter (Make sure you fill the transmission hole with a rag or tape up the opening so debris or small parts can't fall in.

Underneath:
-Remove the exhaust (at least the Y-pipe)
-Remove the Driveshaft
-Support rear axle and remove the torque arm
-Unhook the hydraulic line for the clutch. You do this by pushing the line toward the transmission, then push the plastic sleeve toward the transmission, then pull the hydraulic line out.
-Disconnect all the electrical connectors
-Drain Transmission fluid
-Support trans and remove trans mount and crossbrace
-Unbolt transmission from bellhousing ****NOTE!!! Make sure the engine is supported when you pull the transmission out or you can ruin your motor mounts***
-Remove transmission
-Remove bellhousing
-Remove clutch and pressure plate
-Remove flywheel

Rear Main seal:
OK, if you are going to change the rear main seal there is an important note to remember. The seal needs to be PERFECTLY aligned with the crankshaft and rear cover or it will leak like an SOB. In theory, if you leave the rear cover on you should be able to pop the old seal out and put the new one in and maintain proper alignment. There is a special tool to align the rear (and front also) main seal that you MUST HAVE to guarantee proper alignment. I'll go over it further when I re-install the rear cover and new seal. DO NOT try and eyeball this seal as there will be about a 99.75% chance you will end up having to pull everything apart again to fix it correctly because the engine will spew out oil everywhere.


New Parts waiting to get installed
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Transmission ready to come out
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Transmission after removal
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Old clutch with 75K on it (ewww!)
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Don't let it fool you, the rear main is leaking badly, I just already cleaned the block. I also removed the rear cover to clean
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To the scrap heap!
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For this post:
No New Parts

Total Cost for This post: $0.00
Total Cost Overall: $5289.00

Labor this Post: 5 hours
Total Labor: 84 hrs
Last edited by NBrehm on Wed May 27, 2020 8:12 am, edited 3 times in total.
-Nick
2001 Formula Firehawk #293

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Re: 2001 Formula Hawk #293 Restoration thread.

Post by NBrehm » Tue May 05, 2020 7:23 am

Well, for now re-assembly has come to a grinding halt for a part I probably should of had the foresight to order, but it is out of sight out of mind so I wanted to cover it here for you guys. Underneath the rear main seal cover, on the back of the block is a part known as the "Barbell". What it actually does is it is a plastic plug that sits in the oil galley and it diverts oil down into the filter so it can be pumped up to the valvetrain. It looks like this
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The Ribbed side sits in the block and diverts the oil down to the filter, then it flows back up over the "bar" and to the heads. The plug at the back with the O-Ring is what you see on the back of the block. As you can see in the picture of mine it is weeping oil, which means the O-ring is compromised in some way shape or form.
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If that O-ring breaks oil will stop going to the top of the engine and start pouring out the back of the block into the oil pan, oil pressure will drop to near zero, and *BOOM*, bye bye engine.

They do make nice billet ones, if I'd had the forethought to order it beforehand I would go that route, but I don't have 10 days to wait for it to get here so I got one coming from the dealership.
-Nick
2001 Formula Firehawk #293

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NBrehm
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Re: 2001 Formula Hawk #293 Restoration thread.

Post by NBrehm » Tue May 05, 2020 7:32 pm

Ok todays progress. Got the new Oil diverter barbell. Removal of the old one is pretty easy. I used a very small flathead screw driver to carefully pry it out of the block just a little bit. Once I had an edge I just used regular pliers and pulled it out.
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Installation of the new one is cake, just press it in. I ended up having to give a light tap with a plastic hammer and it popped right in. With that done it was on to the rear cover. It isn't as straight forward a job as you'd expect. First you have to clean everything. Where the rear cover meets the oil pan there is some RTV in the corners, get all the old RTV off. Clean the oil pan surface and the back of the crankshaft so they are oil free and down to the bare aluminum. Put some RTV in the lower corners of the rear cover where it meets the oil pan (blue arrows) then put the cover on and tighten allt eh cover bolts down to snug. THEN install the 2 long oil pan to rear cover bolts and snug them down.
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Then install the alignment tool (I got mine from Sac City Corvette, makes it a snap)
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Then torque the bolts in this order:
Oil pan to rear cover FIRST: 106 in/lb
Rear cover bolts: 18 Lb Ft
Once the cover is tight you can then grab your rear main seal and place it on the crank. You can then use the alignment tool to tap the seal in. Important note for the seal, you put oil on the BACK SIDE only, meaning where it butts up against the cover. It gets installed dry on the crank which is why the crank had to be scrubbed down to get all the oil off
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For this post:
Torque Specs:
Rear Cover Bolts: 18 LB/FT
Oil Pan to cover bolts: 106 in/LB

Parts
Oil Diverter barbell GM12573460: $17:00
ARP rear Cover Bolts 434-1503: $27.00
Rear Main Seal GM 89060436: $22.00
Rear Cover Gasket GM 12639249: $24.00
Sac City Corvette Alignit tool: $47.00
Permatex Black RTV: $7.00

Total Cost for This post: $144.00
Total Cost Overall: $5433.00

Labor this Post: 2 hours
Total Labor: 86 hrs
Last edited by NBrehm on Tue May 05, 2020 8:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
-Nick
2001 Formula Firehawk #293

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Re: 2001 Formula Hawk #293 Restoration thread.

Post by NBrehm » Tue May 05, 2020 7:59 pm

Next up was the clutch and flywheel. Pretty straightforward here. An important note is if you get a clutch and flywheel, the manufacturer usually balances it and then sends it to you in the correct clock position. Before you disassemble it mark the pressure plate and flywheel to ensure it goes back together the same way. I used Monster for my clutch, and they sent it pre-marked with a green paint so it was already gtg.
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Flywheel installation:
Put the flywheel up onto the crank shaft and push it all the way back. I used a rubber mallet to get it squared up, you could also tighten the bolts to snug and get it there that way too. I upgraded to ARP bolts for clutch and pressure plate, I highly recommend at least replacing the flywheel bolts if you don't upgrade. So next you put a little bit of blue loctite on each bolt and thread them in to snug against the flywheel. Now get your torque wrench, you are going to tighten them 3 times using the below pictured pattern. A flywheel holding tool will be needed for the final pass.
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Pass #1: 15 LB/ft
Pass #2: 37 LB/ft
Pass #3: 74 LB/ft
Once it's tight, now is a good time to also change the pilot bearing, a better time would of been when the old flywheel was on, but if you are like me you forget about that until now.. You will need a pilot Bearing puller to get it out. To put the new in simply tap it with a deadblow hammer to get it started, then you can drive it in with a deep socket that is the same size.
Next, grab the clutch disc and alignment tool and stick it into the pilot bearing and flywheel
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Lastly, grab the pressure plate (make sure you line it up with the marks you put on the flywheel), snug the bolts down, then tighten them to 52LB/ft in the same pattern as the flywheel.
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For this post:
Torque Specs:
Flywheel: 15LB/ft, Then 37 LB/ft, Then 74 LB/ft
Pressure plate: 52 LB/ft


Parts
Monster Stage 2 clutch Kit $850.00
-Includes bearing, flywheel, slave Cyl
ARP Flywheel Bolts 330-2802: $29.00
ARP Pressure Plate Bolts 134-2201: $17.00

Total Cost for This post: $896.00
Total Cost Overall: $6329.00

Labor this Post: 2 hours
Total Labor: 88 hrs
Last edited by NBrehm on Wed May 27, 2020 8:18 am, edited 3 times in total.
-Nick
2001 Formula Firehawk #293

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Re: 2001 Formula Hawk #293 Restoration thread.

Post by NBrehm » Tue May 05, 2020 8:07 pm

Next, I took the time while the exhaust was off to pull all the heat shields up front, clean them up and paint them. Only pointers here are patience and high temp paint. I took down heavy corrosion spots with 80 grit sandpaper, then sanded the entire shield with 150 grit. Primed with self etching primer, then painted them with high temp silver paint. I also polished all of the hardware with a wire wheel and then painted them with high temp clear. I had all the supplies on hand so it was just labor
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For this post:
Parts
None

Total Cost for This post: $0.00 - had paint supplies already
Total Cost Overall: $6329.00

Labor this Post: 6 hours
Total Labor: 94 hrs
-Nick
2001 Formula Firehawk #293

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NBrehm
Posts: 209
Joined: Sun Jun 28, 2015 8:58 pm
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Re: 2001 Formula Hawk #293 Restoration thread.

Post by NBrehm » Sat May 09, 2020 9:34 pm

Alright, wrapping this up finally. I got everything back together (install in reverse order). Bled the clutch using a remote bleeder, which makes it much, much easier, and put all the new suspension stuff on that was (mostly) borrowed from the GTA. Here's the highlights:

Clutch bleeding: if you have ever bled LS1 clutch hydraulics, you know they can be a royal PITA. To make it easier when I ordered my clutch from Monster I added the remote bleeder option. All this adds is a braided line similar to your master cylinder line that threads into the slave cylinder, and at the other end is a fitting that looks like a brake caliper bleeder. Once you hook the line up, thread it up the drivers side with the master cylinder line and you can put it right into the master cylinder reservoir. Then you just keep pumping the clutch and as it expels air it replaces it with fluid. Just make sure you don't go below the fitting and suck air back into the system, so watch your fluid level. Even with this it took quite a bit of time and I ended up letting it sit overnight and finally got a good pedal the following morning.

Subframe connectors: I went with BMR bolt on connectors. Some people don't like bolt ons, but I like the option to remove them if I so choose without cutting. Super easy installation, pop out the LCA bolt, put the connector over the hole and reinsert the bolt LOOSE, just snug it down. Then up front you have to fish the 2 plates into the front subframe, I ended up having to modify the passenger side plate a bit, and drill out the hole in the subframe as the welds on the subframe were less than perfect and the sheetmetal wasn't lined up (factory defect). MAKE SURE YOU PAINT ANYTHING YOU TAKE PAINT OFF OF!!! Once the plates were in I put the bolts in and also left them loose for now and just snugged them down. You are going to want the car to have the weight on the wheels before you tighten them down.
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Torque Arm relocation/Trans mt, Torque Arm: Again, super easy and straight forward. My only suggestion would be to put the torque arm in before the driveshaft to give you extra room to get to the front bolts, but they can be reached with some effort with the driveshaft in. You bolt it on in place of the original transmission crossbrace. Since I had a lift I used a jack stand to take the weight off the rear axle, put the torque arm on, then the rear bolts. You have to put the front bushing in the clamshell before you bolt it on, the metal plate goes between the bushing and the DS of the mount. Once you have that done, you can push it all together and put the bolts in. I found after some trial and error that the 4th set of holes from the top gave me the correct driveshaft angle with the LE2 springs. You can tighten all of this down now, and reinstall the driveshaft. With weight on the wheels the driveshaft should be pretty straight between the 2 yokes with the transmission side just slightly higher than the rear axle. You don't want a sharp angle on the U-Joints, and you absolutely DO NOT want the axle end higher than the transmission.
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Panhard bar, relocation kit, and LCA's: I won't bore you with these, very basic install. I used adjustable with 1 rod end and 1 poly bushing. Only advice here is put the poly bushings on the body of the car, and the rod ends on the rear axle (keep the noise down). You can torque the rod ends downon the LCA's, leave the poly bushing hand tight for now to avoid pre-load if the weight is off the axle. If you changed it on the ground you can torque it all down, otherwise lower the car and torque to spec. Panhard bar can also be torqued down with the car off the ground.
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Basic Alignment: Alright, so, if you got adjustable parts for the rear, this is a good way to "WAG" the alignment until you can get the car aligned properly. Before you get panicky, the odds are pretty darn good your rear axle wasn't straight from the factory, so even if you miss a little bit it won't be catastrophic. Having said that, Plan a proper alignment in the near future. I am lucky and had a lift and an old set of car dollies I used for casters and a little bit of ground clearance. The car HAS to be on all 4 wheels and supported by the suspension for accurate measurements. DO NOT support it by the body or you will end up way off. ****UPDATE - After getting an actual alignment, this method left the rear axle nearly dead center of it's factory tolerances and no adjustments were needed****
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1. Measure hole center to hole center on the original panhard bar and LCA's. This will get you in the ball park. If you had to adjust the LCA's in or out to get them on, you can set their initial length with the weight off the wheels to make it easier. My LCA's measured 19.5" from hole center to hole center, and the Panhard bar was 43 Inches.
2. Lower the car (if you haven't already) and give the suspension a couple good bounces to take any slop out of the suspension
3. Measure from one end of the wheelwell to the other across the CENTER of the hub (I got a tick over 30 inches). Adjust the control arm until the center of the hub is halfway between each side of the wheel arch. Tighten the jam nuts but don't lock-tite them yet. Repeat on the other side.
4. Panhard bar: You will need 2 plum-bobs. If you don't have them they are super easy to make, just grab some string, some tape, and 2 nuts, washers, or some other type of weight. Tie the string onto the weight and tape it to the top of the wheel arch so it hangs down PAST the hub center. make sure you use painters or masking tape so you don't kill your paint, and wash the area down first.
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5. Once the weights stop moving, you can measure from the center of the wheel hub to where it crosses the string.
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6. You can now adjust the panhard bar until the distance from both hubs to the string is equal on both sides. Mine lined up at about 2 1/16", give or take. Lock down the adjusters so they don't move.
7. Take the car for a ride (nothing crazy, just go hit a couple bumps, load and unload the suspension a little then bring it back and re take all the measurements. If it's off, repeat the process. If the measurements are all the same back off the jam nuts one at a time, put some blue loctite on the threads, and lock them down again unless you are on your way to get an alignment, then make sure they are loctited after the alignment.
8. Check the jam nuts periodically after a few hundred miles to make sure they don't come loose again, then just add them to the list of checks at oil change intervals

After that the exhaust clamp showed up, so i got the exhaust back on and it all back togehter
Image

For this post:
Torque Specs:
Bellhousing Bolts: 35 FT/LB
Trans to Bellhousing Bolts: 35 FT/LB
Front SFC Bolts: 80 FT/LB
Rear SFC bolts: 100 FT/LB
LCA Bolts: 75 FT/LB (front to 100 FT/LB if you have SFC's) THEN grease bushings
Rear Torque Arm bolts: 95 FT/LB
Panhard Bar Bolts: 75 FT/LB, THEN grease bushings
U-Joint Strap Bolts: 16 FT/LB - DO NOT over tighten!!


Parts
Slave Cylinder + remote bleeder: $0.00 (included with clutch)
Bellhousing Bolts ARP 434-0901: $40.00
Transmission Bolts ARP 762-1005 (X8): $50.00
Torque Arm Relocation crossmember BMR TCC006H: $220.00
Torque Arm BMR TA002H: $270.00
Subframe Connectors BMR SFC023H: $205.00
Adjustable LCAS BMR TCA004: $220.00
Adjustable Panhard Bar BMR PHR010H: $150.00
Panhard relocation kit BMR PHR004H : $140.00
Transmission Mount Prothane 1604-BL: $31.00




Total Cost for This post: $1326.00
Total Cost Overall: $7655.00

Labor this Post: 13 hours
Total Labor: 107 hours
Last edited by NBrehm on Wed May 27, 2020 8:26 am, edited 2 times in total.
-Nick
2001 Formula Firehawk #293

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